Mind Over Meter – How Others Have Combined These Options – Pages 81-84

How Others Have Combined The ‘Options’ (from page 82-84)

In this section we’ll look at how at least six different drummers have (or would) combine the seven options in a unique manner using the same sticking. We’ll use the paradiddlediddle sticking as a starting point:

EX1

 

 

 

EX1 AUDIO

 

And we will substitute the last right for a bass drum:

EX2

 

 

 

EX2 AUDIO

 

 

Elvin Jones: Orchestration and Permutation

Elvin was renowned for his ability to improvise with rolling triplet ideas. In 2009 I was honoured to be on the same clinic bill at Music Live at Birmingham N.E.C as Jerry Brown, Robin Guy and many other incredible drummers, including über-drummer Neal Wilkinson. A question was asked in his clinic regarding the use of rudiments in playing and Neal used this example to demonstrate. Using the simple paradiddlediddle substitution idea from above he played this Elvin style jazz time pattern – you should pedal 2 and 4 on the hi hats too, but I have left it out for clarity:

EJ EX1

 

 

 

EJ1 AUDIO

 

I played around with this idea at home and permutated it to create the Elvin Jones triplet feel. This involved starting on each possible note. The first example gives you a standard jazz ride cymbal pattern, the others are just permutation ideas. Watch out for the left lead ideas and remember to pedal 2 and 4 on the hi hats:

EJ EX2

 

 

 

EJ2 AUDIO

 

EJ EX3

 

 

 

EJ3 AUDIO

 

EJ EX4

 

 

 

EJ4 AUDIO

 

Of course, you could also orchestrate the hands around the kit to further layer the sound and tone– here is a simple right hand orchestration idea:

EJ EX5 

 

 

 

EJ5 AUDIO

And here are two examples of the ideas in context of jazz time, one slow, one fast:

EJ context example – slow

EJ context example – fast

 

 

Mitch Mitchell: Dynamics and Orchestration

I had read so often of Mitch’s Elvin influence and, of course, I could hear the swing elements in his playing but it wasn’t until Neal played the above idea that I realised there were some directly influenced ideas.

If we take out RLRRLF and purely play around with sound accent ideas and then orchestrate the accents around the kit, we have some perfect Mitch Mitchell fills:

MM EX1

 

 

 

MM EX1 AUDIO

 

MM EX2 and 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

MM EX2 AUDIO

MM EX3 AUDIO

 

Clearly you could permutate and play them through differing subdivisions (Mitch was well know for mixing subdivisions in fills) to create even more ideas.

Here are the examples played in a groove and fill context:

MM context example

 

 

David Garibaldi: Dynamics, Subdivision 1&2, Permutation, Orchestration

As our RLRRLF pattern is linear, I instantly tried to figure out how Tower Of Power supremo drummer David Garibaldi may have implemented the pattern. My initial idea consisted simply of some orchestration and the addition of a RLRL sticking at the end to create a bar of sixteenth notes:

DG EX1

 

 

 

DG EX1 AUDIO

 

Whilst this works fine, I knew there had to be more to this!

The first step was to drop one of the two rights in the sequence to create a five note sequence.

Then I permutated the sticking to begin on a bass drum (we usually start grooves on a bass drum, right?!)

Finally I added the right hand note back in but at double the subdivision it was before:

DG EX2, 3 and 4

 

 

 

DG EX2 AUDIO

DG EX3 AUDIO

DG EX4 AUDIO

 

Here is the final groove (with an added bass drum at the end to create sixteen notes) with orchestration and dynamic (to create a back beat):

DG EX 5

 

 

 

DG EX5 AUDIO

DG EX 5 AUDIO – FAST

 

 

Tony Williams ‘Blushda’: Subdivisions 1&2 and Orchestration

Tony Williams famous lick – the blushda – can be developed and expanded on using this pattern. Here is the basic sticking followed by the adaptation of the first two strokes into a flam:

TW EX1 and 2

 

 

 

TW EX1 and 2 alternating – AUDIO

 

Here it is phrased in 8th note triplets. It also sounds great phrased in 3 16th notes too.

 

 

 

And here’s the fill played in the context of a groove and fill example:

TW groove and fill in context AUDIO

 

 

Vinnie Colaiuta/Steve Gadd/Gospel Chops: Subdivisions 1&2, Orchestration, Dynamics and Embellishment

Here’s a linear idea reminiscent of the likes of Vinnie and Gadd and has all the hallmarks of the note heavy Gospel Chops drummers such as Nissan Stewart and Aaron Spears. Embellish this pattern with a stepped hi hat at the end of the phrase. Be sure to fit it in between the bass drum and the first right hand instead of as an sixteenth note. You need to play the stepped hi hat as a short staccato sound:

VC EX1

 

 

 

VC EX1 AUDIO

 

 

Orchestrated this way you can create a fast sixteenth note triplet phrase with a backbeat on 2 and 4. The cool part of this is the three hi hat notes, the first of which is pedaled then played with the hands:

VC EX2

 

 

 

VC EX2 AUDIO – slow

VC EX2 AUDIO – fast

 

 

 

Jason Bowld: Orchestration, Subdivisions 1&2, Dynamics, Embellishment

My good friend Jason is renowned for his inventiveness and creativity. I put myself in his shoes for this pattern. Here’s the simplified orchestration:

JB EX1

 

 

 

JB EX1 AUDIO

 

 

Now double the right hand on the floor tom:

JB EX2

 

 

 

JB EX2 AUDIO

 

 

add in the bass drum:

JB EX3

 

 

 

JB EX3 – slow

JB EX3 – fast

 

and finally embellish with the left foot bridged between the hi hat and slave double bass drum pedal:

JB EX4 

JB EX 4 – fast

 

The point here is that despite the sticking remaining the same, it’s how the drummer combined the options to make themselves sound unique that stands out. Whilst it’s great to work through these examples, the challenge and fun lies in combining the ‘options’ to create your own unique voice – What will YOU come up with?